Spring 2024

Course Offerings List

Slavery and Abolition in Contemporary Culture (SA)
Subject associations
AAS 330

The politics of the representation of slavery and abolition are visible everywhere right now in contemporary culture - from monument removals, to school curricula bans, to art that provokes us to "imagine successful slave revolts" (Dread Scott, 2019). In this course, students engage with how the history of slavery and abolition is remembered and invoked in the present in museums, news, social movements, rhetoric, policy, and public space. By situating our inquiry in the racial foundations of colonial modernity, and foregrounding structural continuities and discontinuities, we will analyze the political work various representations accomplish.

Instructors
Lyndsey P. Beutin
How We Talk: Linguistic Anthropology Methods and Theories (CD or SA)
Subject associations
ANT 352 / LIN 352

This course provides a hands-on introduction to the methods and theories of linguistic anthropology, a sub-field devoted to the study of language and interaction in sociocultural and political processes. We will consider language as more than a neutral conduit for exchanging information or expressing ideas. Through readings and data gathering and analysis exercises, we will explore language as a resource and a factor that shapes and is shaped by our experiences, identities, relationships with and perception of the world and the people around us. Major themes include race, citizenship, gender, disability, and interpretation and power.

Instructors
Beth Semel
Asian-American Psyches: Model Minority, Microaggressions and Mental Health (CD or SA)
Subject associations
ASA 238 / PSY 205

This course will analyze and evaluate through a psychological lens the psychosocial causes and consequences of significant current events that impact different Asian groups in the U.S., such as pandemic-spurred anti-Asian sentiment and educational policy (e.g., the debate over magnet schools moving to lottery systems rather than test based), as well as long-standing "everyday" experiences common to Asian Americans (e.g., navigating biculturalism, microaggressions and model minority stereotypes) that may impact identity and mental health.

Instructors
Shirley S. Wang
Beginner's American Sign Language II
Subject associations
ASL 102

This course is the second course in the introductory American Sign Language (ASL) course sequence. This course aims to improve conversation skills in ASL, review and refine knowledge of basic grammar, broaden vocabulary, develop ASL-English translation skills, and increase awareness of Deaf culture. Students will develop their ASL skills through in-class interactive activities, and out-of-class readings and exercises.

Instructors
Allison M. Bienas
Daniel W. Maier
Children's Literature (LA)
Subject associations
ENG 304

A survey of classic texts written for children from the past 200 years in (primarily) England and America. We will examine the development and range of the genre from early alphabet books to recent young adult fiction. We'll try to put ourselves in the position of young readers while also studying the works as adult interpreters, asking such questions as: How do stories written for children reflect and shape the lives of their readers? What can children's literature tell us about the history of reading, or of growing up, or of the imagination itself? In the process we will consider psychological and social questions as well as literary ones.

Instructors
William A. Gleason
Learning to 'Spell': Visions of School in Fantasy and Science Fiction (LA)
Subject associations
FRS 126

This course explores fantastical works that showcase the very real issues that shape education, including race, class, gender, privilege, and disability. How might television shows such as The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina or fiction by writers like R.F. Kuang and Ursula Le Guin inform the ways we imagine the educational policies and institutions we frequently take for granted? Throughout the semester, we'll consider the experience of characters like Hermione Granger, Kamala Khan, and the X-Men to see how they speak to our own fantastic lives as students and engaged community members at Princeton.

Instructors
Andrew M. Hakim
The Sixties: Documentary, Youth and the City (CD or HA)
Subject associations
HIS 202 / URB 203 / AMS 202 / AAS 203

This seminar in history and documentary film explores personal narrative and how individual experience contributes to profound social change. We study 1960s youth through oral history, archival research, ethnography and journalism. Trenton NJ is the case study. Themes include: civil rights and Black power; immigration and migration; student uprisings and policing; education; gender and sexuality; churches and city institutions; sports; work, class and neighborhood; politics, law and government. Using documentary narrative, the course asks how a new generation of storytellers will shape public conversations and policy.

Instructors
Purcell Carson
Alison E. Isenberg
Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience (EC)
Subject associations
NEU 202 / PSY 259

Cognitive neuroscience is a young and exciting field with many questions yet to be answered. This course surveys current knowledge about the neural basis of perception, cognition and action and will comprehensively cover topics such as high-level vision, attention, memory, language, decision making, as well as their typical and atypical development. Precepts will discuss the assigned research articles, pertaining to topics covered in class with an emphasis on developing critical reading skills of scientific literature.

Instructors
Fenna Krienen
Systems Neuroscience: Computing with Populations of Neurons (SEL)
Subject associations
NEU 437 / MOL 437 / PSY 437

Introduction to a mathematical description of how networks of neurons can represent information and compute with it. Course will survey computational modeling and data analysis methods for neuroscience. Example topics are short-term memory and decision-making, population coding, modeling behavioral and neural data, and reinforcement learning. Classes will be a mix of lectures from the professor, and presentations of research papers by the students. Two 90 minute lectures, one laboratory. Lectures in common between NEU 437/NEU 537.

Instructors
Carlos D. Brody
Social Psychology (SA)
Subject associations
PSY 252

The scientific study of social behavior, with an emphasis on social interaction and group influence. Topics covered will include social perception, the formation of attitudes and prejudice, attraction, conformity and obedience, altruism and aggression, and group dynamics.

Instructors
J. Nicole Shelton
Educational Psychology (EC)
Subject associations
PSY 307 / TPP 307

Principles of psychology relevant to the theory and practice of education. Through selected readings, discussion, and classroom observations, students study theories of development, learning, cognition (including literacy), and motivation, as well as individual and group differences in these areas; assessment; and the social psychology of the classroom. The course focuses on how learning by children and adolescents at the elementary, middle, and secondary school levels is influenced by their own characteristics and experiences and the various contexts in which they learn: family, school, community and culture.

Instructors
Mark Glat
Schooled: Education, Opportunity, and Inequality (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 228 / SPI 220

Who succeeds in school, and why? What do schools teach students, in addition to reading, writing, and arithmetic? What is the role of schools in modern society? How do schools reproduce, interrupt, or legitimate the social order? In this course, you will apply sociological perspectives to the study of education.

Instructors
Jennifer L. Jennings
Poverty, by America (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 314 / AAS 379

The United States, the richest country on earth, has more poverty than any other advanced democracy. Why? Why does this land of plenty allow one in eight of its children to go without basic necessities, permit scores of its citizens to live and die on the streets, and authorize its corporations to pay poverty wages? Drawing on history, social-scientific research, and reporting, this seminar will attempt to unravel this question. Weekly, we will discuss a topic central to understanding the causes and consequences of, and solutions to, American poverty. We will take field trips, welcome guests, and collaborate on projects to abolish poverty.

Instructors
Matthew Desmond
The Social Meaning of Money (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 350

Money seems to represent the ultimate symbol of economic rationality, a single, impersonal and totally interchangeable medium of exchange. Money is also feared as morally dangerous, replacing personal bonds with cold greed. This seminar will offer a fundamentally different sociological explanation of how money works. Examining different monetary worlds ranging from households and college campuses, to law firms and internet sites, we will explore how our multiple moneys are shaped by cultural meanings, moral concerns, and social relations.

Instructors
Viviana A. Zelizer
Systemic Racism: Myths and Realities (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 373 / AMS 428 / URB 373

This course focuses on the structural and institutional foundations of racial discrimination in the United States. It emphasizes the contributions of sociologists. The course gives a historical overview followed by an investigation of key legislative actions and economic factors inhibiting racial equality. Subsequent topics include migration and immigration; urban development; and residential segregation. The end of the course reviews resistance movements and policies aimed at addressing systemic racism, including restorative justice and reparations.

Instructors
Patricia Fernández-Kelly
Public Economics and Public Policy
Subject associations
SPI 525

This course focuses on the role of the government in the economy. The aim is to provide an understanding of the reasons for government intervention, the impact of public policies on the behavior of economic agents, and the best design of public policies. The course covers tax policy, welfare programs, social insurance, family policy, education, income and wealth inequality, gender inequality, tax evasion, labor supply and taxable income responses, migration, pensions and savings policy. Both theoretical and empirical analyses is brought to bear on each of these questions.

Instructors
Henrik J. Kleven
Sociological Studies of Inequality (Half-Term)
Subject associations
SPI 590C / SOC 571

This segment of the JDP seminar covers theory and research on social stratification, the major subfield in sociology that focuses on inequality. Course begins by reviewing major theories, constructs, measures, and empirical work on inequality. Weeks two through six focus on institutions that are expected to produce (and reproduce) inequalities, including families, neighborhoods, schools, labor markets, and penal policy.

Instructors
Jennifer L. Jennings
Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term): The Economics of Education
Subject associations
SPI 594N

This course explores three questions in the economics of education: What are the economic returns to education? How do people's valuations of education relate to economists' measures of returns? how are individuals' choices and educational outcomes mediated by information? We pay special attention to higher education policy and to choice-based reforms in K-12 education. Do these reforms 'work?' If not, why not? Topics include signaling and human capital theories, valuation of school quality, charter/magnet schools, and informational and financial frictions in higher education.

Instructors
Adam Kapor
Seminar on Student Learning and Methods for Teaching (SA)
Subject associations
TPP 301

A study of essential methods of learning and teaching, including learner characteristics and needs, organization and structure of educational institutions, development of curriculum and instructional goals, preparation of evaluation and assessment, and design of subject/level specific methodologies and classroom management techniques. Required course work includes 22 hours of site-based field experience and evening laboratory sessions. Students should have one morning of unscheduled time available each week to allow for school visits. The course is open to any student who has an interest in teaching.

Instructors
Todd W. Kent
Kathleen M. Nolan
Seminar on Instructional Practice and Pedagogy
Subject associations
TPP 403

TPP 403 is designed to complement TPP 404, Clinical Practice. The course is structured by four themes: The Learner and Learning, Content Knowledge: Planning Instruction and Assessment, Instructional Practice and Pedagogy, and Professional Responsibilities. Major course assignments address these themes through a focus on the research and practice of meeting the diverse needs of learners. The course is designed to help students connect theory and practice, become self-reflective practitioners, use data from formative and summative assessments to inform instruction, and to prepare them for being in the classroom.

Instructors
Ashley T. Jaffee
Jessica R. Monaghan