Fall 2024

Course Offerings List

Ethnography of Schools and Schooling (SA)
Subject associations
ANT 368 / TPP 368

Social scientists use ethnographic methods to describe and analyze the range and variation of daily interactions in schools. Ethnographic study allows researchers the opportunity to examine power dynamics that influence the daily life of students, teachers, administrators and parents. Vivid, critical ethnography helps us discover how cultural traditions, expectations, and opportunities are passed down to the next generation and how they impact school outcomes. This class will explore educational ethnography and students will complete observation hours in local schools and prepare a descriptive, mini-ethnography of a school community.

Instructors
Jason R. Klugman
Beginner's American Sign Language I
Subject associations
ASL 101

This course is the first course in the introductory American Sign Language (ASL) course sequence. The primary goal is to build a strong foundation for attaining proficiency in American Sign Language and understanding Deaf culture. Students will acquire basic vocabulary and grammar through in-class interactive activities, and out-of-class readings and exercises. Students also will focus on developing visual skills, which are critical to attaining proficiency in ASL. In addition, students will be introduced to Deaf/disability studies, including American Deaf culture and history.

Instructors
Staff
Crafting Freedom: Women and Liberation in the Americas (1960s to the present) (CD or LA)
Subject associations
COM 476 / AAS 476 / GSS 476 / LAS 476

This course explores questions and practices of liberation in writings by women philosophers and poets whose work helped to create cultural and political movements in the U.S. and Latin America. Starting in the 60s, we will study a poetics and politics of liberation, paying special attention to the role played by language and imagination when ideas translate onto social movements related to social justice, structural violence, education, care, and the commons. Readings include Gloria Anzaldúa, Angela Davis, Silvia Federici, Diamela Eltit, Audre Lorde, Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui, Gayatri Spivak, Zapatistas, among others.

Instructors
Susana Draper
Scholarly Approaches to Teaching
Subject associations
CTL 501

Open to graduate students from all disciplines who have already taught (or will teach during the seminar semester) at Princeton. The course engages participants in critical discussions of current scholarship in the fields of teaching and learning, with a particular emphasis on inclusive teaching practices. Students will have ample opportunity to apply what they learn by developing, refining, and reflecting on their own pedagogical approaches.

Instructors
Staff
American Deaf Culture (CD or SA)
Subject associations
LIN 215 / AMS 214 / GHP 315

This course explores the history, culture, and language of the Deaf in the United States. The first part of the course focuses on the history of Deaf people in the United States. The second part discusses various aspects of Deaf culture: language, literature, art, politics, etc. The third part critically examines different issues facing Deaf people here in the United States and around the world. These issues include audism, linguicism, ableism, intersectionality, disability justice, bioethics, and education. No American Sign Language knowledge required.

Instructors
Noah A. Buchholz
Race and Politics in the United States (CD or SA)
Subject associations
POL 344 / AAS 344 / AMS 244

African Americans in the United States have encountered myriad barriers to their quest for inclusion. Drawing on a mix of history and social science, we will come to understand why certain segments of America oppose the full inclusion of African Americans. We will also discuss the political strategies undertaken by the Black community to combat social, political, and economic injustices. The first half of the course will focus on historical antecedents such as the civil rights movement and the Black Power movement. The second half of the course will focus on the nature of contemporary racial attitudes in the 21st century.

Instructors
LaFleur Stephens-Dougan
The Politics of Higher Education: Competing Visions of the University (SA)
Subject associations
POL 491 / CLA 491 / HUM 490

This course will examine the history, contemporary reality, and likely future of higher education, especially in the United States but also abroad. We will consider the changing and often conflicting ideals and aspirations of parents, students, instructors, and administrators from classical Rome to Christian institutions in the European Middle Ages to American athletic powerhouses today, seeking answers to fundamental practical, economic, and political questions that provoke vigorous contemporary debate.

Instructors
Allen Carl Guelzo
John B. Londregan
Introduction to Psychology (SEL)
Subject associations
PSY 101

The study of human nature from the viewpoint of psychological science. Topics range from the biological bases of human perception, thought and action to the social-psychological determinants of individual and group behavior. This course can be used to satisfy the science and technology with laboratory general education requirement.

Instructors
Joel Cooper
Developmental Psychology (EC)
Subject associations
PSY 254 / CGS 254

Babies, who look like helpless blobs, are capable of impressive feats of learning. 3-year-olds, who can't cross the street alone, know an astounding amount of information about their environments. We will focus on landmark studies that elucidate how children's biology, cognition, language, and social experiences interact to set the stage for what we do and who we are. Is the baby's world a 'blooming, buzzing confusion', or do babies enter the world prepared to make sense of their environments? How can we understand the collaboration between nature and nurture during development?

Instructors
Casey Lew-Williams
Educational Psychology (EC)
Subject associations
PSY 307 / TPP 307

Principles of psychology relevant to the theory and practice of education. Through readings, discussion, and classroom observations, students study theories of development, learning, cognition (including literacy), and motivation, as well as relevant individual and group differences; assessment; and the social psychology of the classroom. The course focuses on two main topics: 1) how learning at multiple school levels is influenced by one's own characteristics, experiences, and various learning contexts; and 2) how the practice of teaching is, in fact, a clinical practice and what that means for educators, students, schools and society.

Instructors
Mark Glat
Introduction to Sociology (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 101

Introduction to Sociology looks at the social forces--some strikingly obvious, some hidden yet powerful--that shape our lives and the world around us. Our choices as individuals are almost always enmeshed in deeper social structures, such as perceived racial categories, the geography of job opportunities, and who we know and don't know. Sociology gives us diverse conceptual and methodological tools to help us uncover these social structures and understand how they shape our lives. This course introduces some of sociology's best-known tools and insights they've revealed so far.

Instructors
Kyle Chan
Urban Sociology: The City and Social Change in the Americas (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 210 / LAS 210 / URB 210 / LAO 210

By taking a comparative approach, this course examines the role of social, economic, and political factors in the emergence and transformation of modern cities in the United States and selected areas of Latin America. We consider the city in its dual image: both as a center of progress and as a redoubt of social problems, especially poverty. Attention is given to spatial processes that have resulted in the aggregation and desegregation of populations differentiated by social class and race.

Instructors
Patricia Fernández-Kelly
Claims and Evidence in Sociology (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 300

This course is an introduction to the logic and practice of social science research. The goal is to provide methodological training that will enable students to design and execute successful independent research projects. We review a range of approaches used by sociologists to answer research questions, including field experiments, surveys, observation, in-depth interviews, and mixed method research.

Instructors
James M. Raymo
Janet A. Vertesi
Race and Public Policy (SA)
Subject associations
SPI 331 / SOC 312 / AAS 317 / POL 343

Analyzes the historical construction of race as a concept in American society, how and why this concept was institutionalized publicly and privately in various arenas of U.S. public life at different historical junctures, and the progress that has been made in dismantling racialized institutions since the civil rights era.

Instructors
Ismail K. White
The Geography of Opportunity in America (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 391 / SPI 431

Does where you live determine your destiny? This seminar will engage students in a rich dialogue about these questions and more, drawing from the best social science evidence to date from the social sciences. In the first half of the course, we will consider research conducted on neighborhood-level (census tract) differences in big cities. In the second half, we will consider research focusing on differences between communities across the entire U.S., including rural America. Student presentations are a significant part of this course.

Instructors
Kathryn J. Edin
Topics in Domestic Policy: Poverty and Public Policy
Subject associations
SPI 528C

This course examines the causes and consequences of U.S. poverty, its implications, and strategies for addressing it. Covers the major explanations advanced to explain the persistence of poverty in the U.S. including labor markets, residential segregation, welfare policy, family structure, and the criminal justice system. Surveys a range of interventions aimed at alleviating urban poverty.

Instructors
Kathryn J. Edin
Urban Inequality and Social Policy
Subject associations
SPI 537 / SOC 537

This course focuses on the causes, consequences, and responses to urban inequality. The course is organized in four parts. First, we consider how one comes to learn about and understand cities and neighborhoods. Second, we review classic and current ideas about how urbanization affects the way we live and interact with each other. Third, we assess various explanations for urban inequality. Fourth, we focus our attention on central problems and challenges of urban life, from segregation to violence, and consider policy responses.

Instructors
Patrick T. Sharkey
Policy Workshop: Public Education in Puerto Rico
Subject associations
SPI 591D

This Policy Workshop will examine public education in Puerto Rico.

Instructors
Eduardo Bhatia
Seminar on Student Learning and Methods for Teaching (SA)
Subject associations
TPP 301

A study of essential methods of learning and teaching, including learner characteristics and needs, organization and structure of educational institutions, development of curriculum and instructional goals, preparation of evaluation and assessment, and design of subject/level specific methodologies and classroom management techniques. Required course work includes 22 hours of site-based field experience and evening laboratory sessions. Students should have one morning of unscheduled time available each week to allow for school visits. The course is open to any student who has an interest in teaching.

Instructors
Todd W. Kent
Kathleen M. Nolan
Seminar on Instructional Practice and Pedagogy
Subject associations
TPP 403

TPP 403 is designed to complement TPP 404, Clinical Practice. The course is structured by four themes: The Learner and Learning, Content Knowledge: Planning Instruction and Assessment, Instructional Practice and Pedagogy, and Professional Responsibilities. Major course assignments address these themes through a focus on the research and practice of meeting the diverse needs of learners. The course is designed to help students connect theory and practice, become self-reflective practitioners, use data from formative and summative assessments to inform instruction, and to prepare them for being in the classroom.

Instructors
Ashley T. Jaffee
Jessica R. Monaghan
Clinical Practice
Subject associations
TPP 404

TPP 404 (complements TPP 403) is a 175-hour assignment as a student teacher in a local middle or high school, w/approximately 20 hours of clinical work per week over 12 weeks. Students assume increasing control of instruction with support of a host teacher, and the experience culminates with the design and delivery of a small unit of instruction. Assignments include research on the classroom and school context and an analysis of the unit of instruction taught in the final weeks of the semester. The course objectives focus on the role of classroom context in the teaching and learning process, instructional planning, and teacher reflection.

Instructors
Ashley T. Jaffee
Jessica R. Monaghan
Kathleen M. Nolan
Seminar on Education-Theory and Practice
Subject associations
TPP 405

The Seminar on Education-Theory and Practice is designed to intersect with and compliment Practice Teaching (TPP 406). Students will read and reflect on educational research and reflect on how to best integrate theory and practice in the reality of their school setting. Students investigate the processes of curriculum development and implementation, develop learning goals and lesson plans, and learn strategies for measuring student learning by applying both formative and summative assessments. Prerequisite: permission from the Director of Teacher Certification. Students enroll in the seminar concurrently with TPP 406.

Instructors
Kathleen M. Nolan
Practice Teaching
Subject associations
TPP 406

Supervised practice teaching (a minimum of 12 weeks) in a local school. Teaching is done under the supervision of an accomplished teacher and a program staff member who regularly observes and discusses the student's practice teaching. Students gain firsthand experience in developing teaching strategies, planning and differentiating instruction, assessing student learning, and classroom management. Must be taken concurrently with TPP 405.

Instructors
Ashley T. Jaffee
Jessica R. Monaghan